Raw food recipes with dill

Cauliflower is rich in calcium, boron, iron, and other minerals. It is reputed to have cancer-fighting nutrients in the form of antioxidants. These compounds appear to stop enzymes from activating cancer-causing agents in the body, and they increase the activity of enzymes that disable and eliminate carcinogens.

Researchers suggest that a high intake of cruciferous vegetables helps decrease the risk of certain cancers. Here's an easy way to add cauliflower to your diet.

If you want to feel more grounded and nourished after a meal, look no further than mushrooms with their earthly flavor combined onions. They pair well with onions and leeks in this creamy warm winter soup.

Full of flavor and earthly goodness, this recipe is a hearty welcome to the new growing season and to one of the first food crops of the year – radishes.

Lose that old lay-down vegetable tray! Why not arrange the vegetables vertically to make a holiday table centerpiece that doubles as a vegetable and dip dish?

Love citrus fruit? Enjoy it as a salad. The combination of sweet and sour fruits with a nut-based dressing will satisfy your taste buds and works great as a meal in itself.

A mouthful of creamy soup tastes so good when the fall chill comes! Serve slightly warmed for a superb culinary experience. An especially nice luncheon soup around Thanksgiving or even Christmas.

It’s delicious! A lovely, rich, subtle flavor. And a great way to use the pulp left from vegetable juice.

One of the great pleasures of dining raw is sampling the raw recipes of other cultures. Here’s a terrific marinated carrot salad—a common enough theme across cultures, but this time with a Korean twist.

If you ever miss clam chowder, then this soup is for you. It can be served cold or even warmed up in a blender or on a stove top to about 100F.

These make fabulous finger foods for picnics, potlucks, receptions, and events of all kinds.

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